• HRA 2017
    Human Rights Award 2017 goes to Maman Colonelle
  • IWD-2018
    Press for Progress on gender equality in the media
  • WSIS recognizes WACC’s communication work
    WSIS recognizes WACC’s communication work
  • CR2018
    Join WACC in celebrating World Radio Day 2018
  • 50 years
  • Sleepwalking
    Evidence-based journalism vs. sleepwalking into censorship
  • AGS
    WACC prepares for new leadership in 2018
  • Nairobi
    School highlights displacement, dialogue and peace building
  • HRA 2017
  • IWD-2018
  • WSIS recognizes WACC’s communication work
  • CR2018
  • 50 years
  • Sleepwalking
  • AGS
  • Nairobi

WACC's JOURNAL
Media Development 2018-1

Gender and Media—A holistic agenda

The articles in this issue call for the global development agenda to promote gender equality and women’s rights, including requiring governments to work to end gender discrimination and promote equality in their laws, policies, and practices. Media output that clearly challenges gender stereotypes will help eliminate the prejudices, attitudes, norms, and practices that sustain gender-based discrimination, marginalization, and inequality.
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Connecting Minorities and Displaced People in Georgia

Discrimination against ethno-cultural minorities and forcibly displaced people is a significant problem in Georgia. This problem is accentuated by a lack of communication channels between these groups and broader Georgian society, limited access to information in minority languages, and the absence of a lingua franca that would enable greater dialogue and engagement.

WACC partnered with Tbilisi-based Studio Mobile- Accent on Action to build the communication capacity of key civil society actors in five regions of Georgia  By the end of the project, 54 people, most of whom were women from ethno-cultural minority communities in the regions of Samegrelo, Shida Kartli, Kvemo Kartli, Samtskhe-Javakhet, had benefited from the program. The project helped to reduce discrimination and provided new tools for inter-cultural communication. However, the most significant change the project helped bring about was a change of attitude among some of the participants, who now feel they can “do something useful for their communities” by bringing attention and visibility to local issues.


 WACC's Journal

 

  

 

 

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 2018